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New Faculty

2007

abhi shelat
abhi shelat
PhD, MIT, 2005,
Joined UVA in Fall 2007

shelat's research focuses on the modern study of cryptography. He investigates techniques for facilitating interactions between distrustful entities (e.g., automated tellers, wireless networks, internet banking, satellite radio/TV, etc). He emphasizes rigorous methods in combination with precise yet practical definitions and assumptions. Recent works considers topics such as exploiting imperfect reference strings, efficient access to untrusted shared memory, adaptive oblivious transfer, obfuscation, non-interactive and fair zero-knowledge proofs, collusion-free protocols, digital fingerprinting, and data compression.


Mark Sherriff
Mark Sherriff
PhD, North Carolina State University, 2007,
Joined UVA in Fall 2007

Sherriff's research interests are in empirical software engineering and computer science education. His recent work in software engineering has focused on using singular value decomposition with software development artifacts to highlight relationships within software systems. These relationships are based upon empirical records of system development and maintenance and can describe the evolution of the software system. In computer science education, Mark's research has focused on project-based learning, including how to effectively create student groups and how to teach complex topics using hands-on, long-term projects.


2006

Kamin Whitehouse
Kamin Whitehouse
PhD, Berkeley, 2006,
Joined UVA in Fall 2006

For more information about Prof. Whitehouse's research, please visit his personal home page.


Jason Lawrence
Jason Lawrence
PhD, Princeton, 2006,
Joined UVA in Fall 2006

Lawrence's research explores techniques for integrating empirical data into the computer graphics pipeline. The goal of his work is to enable artists, designers and hobbyists to easily acquire and incorporate measurements of complex real-world phenomena into synthetic imagery. Reaching this goal will require addressing open research problems related to the efficient acquisition, representation, storage and retrieval of high-dimensional datasets commonly encountered in graphics. He introduced several new representations for surface reflectance functions derived from measured data. He is investigating generative probabilistic models for representing a broader class of light transport functions.


Westley Weimer
Westley Weimer
PhD, Berkeley, 2005,
Joined UVA in Jan 2006
For more information about Prof. Weimer's research, please visit his home page.

2005

Sudhanva Gurumurthi
Sudhanva Gurumurthi
PhD, Penn State University, 2005,
Joined UVA in Fall 2005

Gurumurthi works in the area of computer architecture. His research group is currently exploring issues related to data center energy management, silicon reliability, and memory systems and I/O. Gurumurthi's research contributions include complete-machine power simulation, Dynamic RPM (DRPM) disk drives, Intra-Disk Parallelism, temperature modeling and management of storage systems, techniques to improve Redundant Multi-Threading, runtime AVF estimation techniques, and non-volatile memory hierarchy design. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation, Intel, Google, and Hewlett-Packard.


Kim Hazelwood
Kim Hazelwood
PhD, Harvard University, 2004,
Joined UVA in Fall 2005

Hazelwood's research interests include all aspects of optimizing compilers and computer architecture. She focuses on infrastructures for and applications of dynamic binary modification. Her earlier work investigated the problem of caching and managing modified code. She has also explored several program optimizations that can be applied at run time. More recently, she has been interested in applying dynamic binary optimizers to the areas of low-power computing, reliability, and embedded systems. She collaborates on the Pin Project and leads the Tortola Project.


2004

Aaron Bloomfield
Aaron Bloomfield
PhD, U. Pennsylvania, 2003,
Joined UVA in September 2004

Bloomfield's research interests in computer graphics and user interfaces focus on haptics: using the sense of touch to provide feedback to a virtual reality user. For example, by placing small, vibrating motors (aka 'tactors') on the skin's surface, the user can 'feel' the virtual world as they move through it - the tactors activate when the user collides with an object in the virtual environment. He is also interested in computer science education, specifically the undergraduate experience.


Mary Lou Soffa
Mary Lou Soffa
PhD, Univ. of Pittsburgh, 1977,
Joined UVA in Fall 2004

Soffa's research interests include software tools for debugging and testing programs, compilers, optimizations, and program analysis. She has published over 150 papers in journals and conferences.